SOUTHEAST U. S. ECONOMY, NEWS AND OPINIONS

U. S. economy, news and opinions in eleven Southeastern States. Realty Leaders is looking for more current posting information from other real estate agents in the Southeast. Please send your information to the provided email address within this web site.

Unfortunately, if you are refinancing or purchasing a home by obtaining a mortgage loan through a lender, your home appraisal fee will probably be $350-$500 depending on lender internal requirements as well as their choice of an Appraisal Management Company (AMC); since 21 July 2010, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act created significant financial regulation over mortgage lenders and has also been more detrimental to the consumer in regards to more documentation and higher costs. The mortgage lending red tape has harmed good real estate appraisers trying to adhere to all of the numerous and onerous new regulations for appraisal opinion reporting. The government’s creation of more and more red tape for mortgage lenders has not been helpful but a direct detriment to consumers, home appraisers and the real estate industry as a whole.

Al Cheney is a Certified Residential Real Property Appraiser in the State of Alabama who offers special “non-financial” appraisal opinion reporting primarily within Baldwin County and Mobile County. Most residential appraisal fees will range from $225-$275 depending on location; more complex properties and or waterfront properties are quoted on a case-by-case basis. If you are a consumer/homeowner requiring an appraisal opinion report for estate settlement, property tax reduction and or any other reason not requiring a mortgage loan, call Al Cheney at 251-533-2424 today and discuss your real estate appraisal problem.

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“A Fragile Economy With High Unemployment And Uncertainty
Will Be More Of A Future Problem Than The BP Oil Spill.”
Al Cheney’s Comments and Opinions for 29 August 2010.

As a local, born and raised in the Mobile Bay Metro Area, I am sincerely happy that the bubbling crude has finally been capped after 90 days-after 90 days! It is worth repeating since this horrific ecological and environmental disaster should have never lasted this long if it wasn’t for the many faux pas by BP Oil and our own government. They say, the majority of the surface oil has dissipated and now can’t be found. Oh, really? The “on the surface” crude problem is only hiding in the depths of the sea-harming crustaceans, oysters and other seafood for years to come.

And, yes! I do realize that biological organisms will thrive on the raw crude and eventually remove it as a major threat but, this will take a very long time. The damage has already been done and its true damage is still hidden in the depths of the sea. Enormous amounts of crude, damaging dispersants, oil soaked wetlands and sea bottoms are here to stay for decades. A possible ecological disaster lurks beneath the sea and within the wetlands for years to come.

Furthermore, the inappropriate government overreach in shutting down oil rigs (overdramatic and very political), media sensationalism damaging our Gulf Coast tourism, and an already weaken real estate industry has created more negative affects upon Alabama and the other States along the Gulf Coast. Honestly, at this time, the affects of any significant real estate recovery and tourism is unknown.

The fact is that, a fragile economy and a weakened real estate industry have been further exacerbated by the crude ecological and environmental disaster, and the crude politics of Washington. And, our tourism for this year has been damaged by irresponsible journalism media. Even so, the coastline of the Gulf States and its real estate will overcome this adversity and will eventually be less affected by the BP oil spill and the many missteps of Washington. The media needs to practice more responsible journalism and avoid the traps of sensationalism. Sensationalism is not journalism!

Well, our coastal properties along the beaches as well as other properties with gulf views and close to water tributaries will eventually improve over time. For now, the recent past spreading of crude through the Gulf of Mexico has resulted in a deeper real estate market slowdown affecting property values near and along the Gulf Coast. Whether legitimate, or not, many homes located well off water tributaries have also been affected to some degree. It is a real estate market slowdown caused by a fragile economy and the worse oil spill known in North America.

From my standpoint, the negative value affects for homes located off the beaches and the Gulf of Mexico should be negligible as time leads us into the future. Then, when looking back in time, I believe, this catastrophe will reflect “a blip on the radar screen” when focusing only on the 90-day oil spill disaster. Then, there could be the possibility of a more normal level and slight positive return of property values; if a more normal level can be equated with a fragile economy under severe stress.

The fragile economy with high unemployment (9.5% but does not include the people who have given up) and uncertainty will be much more of a future problem for Gulf Coast property values than the BP oil spill. As time leads us into the end of 2010 and into the beginning of 2011, an even more fragile economy and real estate industry might be the result when continuing to implement recessive programs and tactics by the government while banks, entrepreneurs and small businesses mostly sit on the sidelines, “digging in their heels” or “going out of business” sales. Only deregulation and lowering taxes, the cessation of large government spending, small business incentives (get the oil riggers, shrimpers and other parts of the Gulf Coast seafood industry back to work) as well as “just plain honest positive talk” from the current Administration and our government representatives (most of them forget that they work for us) will improve the real estate industry-part of the backbone of America!

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The coastal properties in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas will be affected by this catastrophic oil spill for years to come. As of today, now 47 days and still counting, BP Oil has been ineffective in successfully stopping the flow of oil. Therefore, our Gulf Coast is faced with environmental devastation, loss of marine life and wildlife, further property devaluation (not that inept governmental and political faux pas were enough to damage), illusion of an economic recovery, businesses closing, and loss of livelihoods for longtime residents.

As a person who has lived in the Mobile Bay Metro Area (Baldwin County and Mobile County of Alabama) the majority of my life, this massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico conjures up so many emotions and thoughts inside me and, many unkind words (please forgive) towards all who have dragged this on for much too long. Also, the lack of expedience and nondisclosures which could be labeled lies has certainly not helped to comfort Gulf Coast residents. It is quite evident that many Gulf Coast residents do not believe BP Oil and the government have properly handled this oil spill catastrophe.

Anyway, this oil spill catastrophe will apparently be with us for many months and years to come. Our Gulf Coast area will never be the same and will definitely affect the United States as a whole and potentially have International negative implications. Also, unfortunately, coastal properties more than likely will be faced with further decline in value; not that government intrusions and regulations as well as poor and restrictive lending practices have already been enough to damage our property values and the real estate industry as a whole.

So, how will the coastal real estate marketability be affected within the Gulf Coast states? Whether true or not, the stigma of an oil spill catastrophe will, in my opinion, have a potential affect on the marketability of properties along the Gulf Coast. How much of an affect is still an unknown? The future selling of coastal properties should begin to hold the answers to these questions. So, “time will tell.”

Is your coastal property rich in oil? If so, it’s certainly not the way you want to discover oil on your property. Contact a professional you trust and get sound advice when the stigma of oil has knocked on your door. There are many good Certified Real Estate Appraisers and Attorneys in the Gulf Coast states. It is always important to understand the affects of this oil spill upon our coastal properties.

Information and opinions have been provided by Cheney Appraisal Services, Albert Marshall Cheney, a Certified Residential Real Property Appraiser for the state of Alabama, (251) 533-2424. Albert Cheney has over 35 years of real estate experience in the southern part of Alabama.

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